Types of Rubber

TYPES OF RUBBER USED AT HOLZ

Holz Rubber Company uses varying types of rubber. Selecting the right polymer base is important to each project. Our experienced staff works with you to determine what type of rubber works best for your application.

NATURAL RUBBER

  • The raw material to make natural rubber actually does come from trees
  • Produces compounds with high tensile strength, tear strength, tear and abrasion resistance
  • Can be used at lower temperatures, low compression set, and high resilience
  • Not recommended for severe applications with oil and solvent exposure; subject to aging by sun, ozone, and heat
  • Also not good for applications in contact with concentrated acids or alkalis
  • Maximum continuous operating temperature is about 225°F

NEOPRENE (CHLOROPRENE)

  • Good general purpose rubber with properties close to natural rubber, but is synthetically produced
  • Better resistance to oils and solvents compared to natural rubber but similar low compression set
  • Can be compounded for flame resistance
  • Good weathering resistance
  • Poorer low temperature performance compared to natural rubber
  • Not good in applications with concentrated acids or alkalis
  • Maximum continuous operating temperature is about 275°F

NITRILE (BUNA)

  • Much better oil and solvent resistance compared to either natural rubber or Neoprene
  • Recommended for most oil field applications
  • Can be formulated for use at low temperatures
  • Good compression set and abrasion resistance, but poor weathering resistance
  • Can be used with concentrated acids and alkalis but there are better alternatives
  • Maximum continuous operating temperature is about 275°F

HNBR (HYDROGENATED NITRILE)

  • Similar to Nitrile but with improvements in heat and ozone resistance
  • Can be formulated for low temperature applications
  • Excellent for oil field service
  • Usually not recommended in applications with concentrated acids or alkalis
  • Very high cost
  • Maximum continuous operating temperature is about 350°F

STYRENE BUTADIENE (SBR)

  • Originally developed as a low cost substitute for natural rubber
  • Good water resistance and abrasion resistance
  • Poor weathering resistance, but can overcome with specific raw materials
  • Not recommended for contact with oils and solvents
  • Not used with concentrated acids or alkalis
  • Maximum continuous operating temperature is about 225°F

BUTYL

  • Very good resistance to most gases including air
  • highly resistant to ozone and weathering
  • Abrasion resistance close to natural rubber and good for concentrated acids and alkalis
  • Not recommended for petroleum product exposure
  • Maximum continuous operating temperature is about 300°F

EPDM

  • Exceptional resistance to weathering and ozone
  • Excellent resistance to water, most gases, steam, and heat aging
  • Good for exposure to concentrated acids and alkalies, but not recommended for exposure to oils and solvents
  • Maximum continuous operating temperature is about 350°F

FKM (VITON®)

  • High cost, but high performance material
  • Outstanding resistance to most chemicals, oils and solvents
  • Good oxidation and ozone resistance
  • Maximum continuous operating temperature is about 650°F
  • “Viton” is a trademark of DuPont and signifies material produced by DuPont

AFLAS

  • Similar to FKM, but with improved steam aging resistance
  • Lower overall temperature resistance
  • Very costly and seldom used except in very specific oil field applications
  • Maximum continuous operating temperature is about 450°F